Do PRMs Still Work for Today’s Channel Landscape?

In our previous post, we talked about what PRMs were and the benefits of using them. However, with the channel landscape changing, do PRMs still give you the same benefits or is it time to try something different? In this post, we discuss how your partners actually use PRMs, the challenges of the modern channel landscape and what tools your partners might need now. 

How PRMs are actually used

When you check your partners metrics in your PRM do you notice a trend? Are your partners excited early and logging in frequently but then dropping off? Have they complained that your PRM can’t find information, there isn’t anything new, implementing marketing plans is challenging? For a lot of vendors, this is a familiar scenario. 

PRMs are meant to improve your partners’ productivity as they provide the material needed for partners to sell a vendor’s product. But in reality, partners spend hours trying to find the material they need and even more trying to figure out what they should be doing with it. 

The modern channel landscape

The channel landscape has come a long way since the 1990’s. Products take less time to implement and partners are starting to switch from being resellers to managed service providers, who offer support and best practices for their customers. These providers become consultants for their customers, providing information about the products their customers are interested in and helping them find the best fit for their needs. 

Customer demands are changing at a rapid pace and the successful companies are the ones who can keep up. This involves actively collaborating and eliminating friction areas with partners to seize new opportunities, drive growth and generate revenue.

The easier companies can make marketing their products for partners means greater activations and more companies selling their products and services. Key ways they can do this by co-branding, co-selling, complete marketing plans and automation. A typical PRM just isn’t designed for this type of collaboration. 

Going beyond a PRM

Today’s companies need to use platforms that are intuitive and easy for their partners to use. It needs to have the best features of a PRM, while making it easy to market and co-sell. This tool is a combined PRM and Through Channel Marketing Automation (TCMA) platform.

TCMA platforms enable companies to send campaigns and other marketing messages through their partners instead of just handing the messaging to partners and expecting them to figure it out for themselves. These platforms let companies easily and quickly collaborate with partners as partners can add their own material to their vendor’s campaigns. They also allow partners to easily leverage their own networks through the integrations they offer. 

A combined PRM and TCMA platform enables partners to find everything they need in one place. It contains both the benefits of a PRM and the automation of a TCMA platform enabling a partner’s workflow to be seamless. Partners get to learn about their vendor’s product, then use that information to better market their services in co-branded campaigns.  

Here at xAmplify, we were partners once. We thought PRMs were outdated and weren’t designed for how channel partnerships were evolving. That’s why we built xAmplify.

Our platform offers

  • Cross channel and partner activity tracking

Our platform provides detailed and comprehensive analytics on how your partners are using marketing campaigns and the downstream metrics for those campaigns. Plus you get to compare activity across partners. 

  •  Co-branded campaigns 

When you send your campaigns through your partner, our platform automatically inserts your brand and your partner’s logo into video, email, social, event and landing page campaigns. 

  • Seamless syncing with Salesforce

Leads, deals and activity automatically syncs your CRM without any manual entry or customization. 

To learn more about our platform, schedule a demo

Conclusion

PRMs have their place. They’re excellent for storing marketing and sales materials and training partners. They are not designed for the future of the channel sales. PRM +TCMA platform is designed for evolution. These platforms are built for collaboration, marketing and sales. 

Channelnomics: The state of the cloud

In the latest episode of Changing Channels, Larry Walsh gives us the details of cloud adoption in the channel. Over the last few years, the cloud has been the transformative force in the channel. It’s made vendors and partners change the kinds of solutions they sell and how they sell. This episode gives us the results of a 5-year study conducted by Ingram Mirco Cloud and Channelnomics.  

Here’s what we learned

  • $1 out of every $5 of partner revenue comes from the cloud
  • Emerging tech such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and wearables are growing and becoming a larger share of partner revenue
  • 80% of partners want to expand their cloud offerings
  • 63% of partners don’t have a general business plan. Partners are not prepared for the dynamic cloud market.

We highly recommend watching the video instead of just listening to the podcast as it contains graphs and other visuals that make sense of the data. Watch it here

Two Ways to Minimize Channel Conflict

Channel conflict is common. It happens when a partner or vendor’s interests come into conflict with another party’s interests. This is seen when one partner tries to poach another partner’s prospect, when pricing differs, when one partner finds out that the other is getting a better deal from their vendor, etc. While channel conflict won’t disappear, deal registration and other methods can help minimize it. 

Prospects are potential customers. They bring the money while partners and vendors offer a product that solves an issue they have. Prospects are so important that people fight over them constantly

Partners usually find prospects through their own network, through referrals, through their own marketing and through other sales and marketing techniques. However, it’s common for two or more partners to go after the same prospect. This often leads to channel conflict. 

What is Channel Conflict?

Channel conflict occurs when two or more partners bring the same prospect before the vendor. Who does the vendor give the commission to? Is the vendor’s direct sales team also after the prospect? How is the vendor supposed to navigate this? It’s complicated and there are no easy answers….if there even is an answer. 

So what do you do? Aside from trying to solve channel conflict, you can try to prevent it. But like trying to solve channel conflict, that’s also incredibly difficult to do. However, instead of trying to prevent it completely, you can try to minimize it. 

P.S. For more on Channel Conflict, see our previous post, Channel Conflict: The Ultimate Standoff – Can It Ever Be Solved?

Deal Registration and Transparency

While channel conflict won’t disappear completely, there are two ways to minimize it. 

  1. Deal Registration

Deal Registration is an important part of how partners make money. It’s a way for them to share leads and deals that they’re developing for their vendors. This process minimizes channel conflict because once a deal is approved, the partner has a certain amount of time to work the deal without interference from anyone else. Once that period of time has expired, then that lead is available for someone else to work. 

This process works because vendors can enforce that period of time. If another partner approaches a vendor with the same deal, the vendor can easily check to see who registered the deal first. The vendor can then enforce consequences for the partner that didn’t register the deal first. These consequences can range from the loss of money to ending that partner’s relationship with the vendor. 

  1. Transparency

Partners talk to each other. They compare notes. They talk about you. It’s in your best interest to be transparent about who you work with and why. 

Transparency involves clear communication. Communicate with your partners on a regular basis. Make any restrictions you have on region, market, product adjustments, etc….clear. Be clear about your expectations for the relationship and your goals for the partnership.

Communication is key to a good business relationship and channel partners need to trust that they’re playing on a level playing field. 

Transparency also applies to data. Do you know what your partners are doing with the content you give them? How many campaigns are they sending out? What are the open rates? 

Knowing this type of data will ensure that you know how engaged your partners are and which partners may need more support. You’ll be able to see which partners are registering the most deals, sending you the most leads and if they’re not a top tier partner, you  may decide to move them up. You’ll also be able to determine which partners need additional training in your product. If some of your partners have downloaded your quick start guide 10 times, then it might be time to schedule an additional training session on the product. 

You’ll be able to predict how specific partners will handle specific types of campaigns. For example, your partner on the East Coast gets good results with the video campaigns you send them while your partner on the West Coast handles email campaigns really well. In this case, you’ll want to give more of your video campaigns to your East Coast partner while giving the email campaigns to your West Coast partner. 

Knowing how many campaigns your partners have sent out, their open rates and other associated metrics gives you greater insight into what your partners do with the content you send them. This enables you to make better, more informed decisions and allows you to understand how your partners market your product. 

Conclusion

Partnerships are critical to your business and it’s important that your channel partners have a clear understanding of what markets and geographic boundaries and other qualifications they might be working under in representing your brand.

It’s imperative that you recognize that keeping the channels of communications open with your partners is essential. Establishing guidelines and setting expectations will go a long way in minimizing partnership conflicts. At the end of the day, treat your partners with respect, settle disagreements quickly and fairly and you’ll find that these actions will improve your relationships and business. 

What are PRMs?

Partner Relationship Management (PRM) platforms are commonly used in the channel space. But how did they come to be? Here’s a quick rundown of how PRMs came to be, what they are and the benefits of using one.  

PRM platforms are typically self-service platforms. They’re used to educate the partner about the product and used by partners to communicate with and get support from their vendors. They’re also used by partners to request Market Development Funds (MDFs) and to share leads with their vendors. 

The History of PRM

Indirect Sales really took off in the 1990’s with the tech boom. People all over the world wanted server infrastructure, hard drives, databases, ect… Unfortunately, manufacturers like Cisco couldn’t just open up a new office in every region that wanted their products, so they had to find other ways to sell them. 

Distributors are companies who stock a product and sell it to their customers. They were the perfect companies to sell the manufacturers products. However, to sell the manufacturers’ products, the manufacturers had to allow the distributors access to their systems so they could place orders on their clients behalf, submit service tickets and track shipments. But that caused all sorts of problems like distributors having access to systems that the manufacturers didn’t want them to have access to. This created an opportunity. Why not create a separate system for those distributors?

By creating a separate system for distributors, the manufacturers were able to keep their systems private while still giving the distributors what they needed. Eventually those distributors became partners and manufacturers turned into vendors and that separate system became the Partner Relationship Management (PRM) platform that we use today. 

What does a PRM platform contain?

PRM platforms are customized for each company based on their partner programs. However, they all allow vendors to upload and store the content they want to give their partners. Partners can then login, download the content they need and then use that content elsewhere such as in an email. PRMs also offer a deal registration form so that the partner can register any deals and leads they develop for their vendors. 

PRM content storage can be divided into many sections, but here are 4 of the most common ones. 

Marketing 

Your partners will need marketing material to promote your product. Marketing plans, campaigns, social posts, ect… will be put in this section for your partner to download and use in their own marketing system. Partner engagement material such as newsletters will also be put in this section as well. 

Sales 

Your partners will also need to know how to sell your product. Sales enablement material such as price lists, sales scripts and battlecards will be put in this section. The deal registration form may also go in this section as well. 

Partner Support and Management 

Product support guides, documentation and other support material for the product will go in this section. Partner management material such as contracts, onboarding material for the partner program and partner territory assignments will go in this section as well. 

Partner Rewards 

Information about partner rewards will go in this section. This will be information on how to obtain commissions and rebates. If the vendor offers any growth incentives such as bonuses, information on how to obtain them will be in this section as well. 

The Benefits of a PRM?

PRMs offer many benefits. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of some of the benefits you and your partners get from a PRM. 

  • Content is stored in a single place for your partners
  • Promotes trust as partners know that their vendor is giving them support in the form of sales and marketing material
  • Improves your partners productivity as they have access to a lot of information they can use for marketing and sales purposes
  • You can track partner engagement by seeing how many times your partner logs in and the number of downloads each piece of content gets. This shows you which pieces of content your partners are using the most. The number of times your partner logs in gives you an idea of how often they are using the platform. 

PRMs came about because manufacturers wanted to give their distributors a separate system to prevent them from having to access the manufacturers’ systems. As more and more companies got into the channel marketing space, this became the PRM that we use today. PRMs allow partners to access vendor content in one place. Vendors can track their partner engagement by tracking how a partner is interacting with the content they upload into the PRM. PRM content typically consists of marketing and sales material, partner reward information and partner support and management documents.

Keep It Simple for Partners

Channel partners are typically small to medium sized businesses that don’t have the resources that a larger company would have. Partners wear multiple hats in their company. They sell, support, and help make sure customer satisfaction is high. Like most small business owners they are stretched thin while working hard to run and grow their business. In contrast, vendors are typically larger companies and have the resources and expertise to easily leverage their networks to market and sell their products. 

All too often, vendors will hand their partners marketing content and leave them to figure out the rest. Partners don’t have the time to figure out what to do with the material with all the responsibilities they have. Partners can help you scale, but you need to make working with your business simple and easy for your partner. 

Ways to keep things simple for partners

Easier Access to Training Materials

Give your partners easier access to your training materials. Did you send them a Dropbox link to all of your training documents?  Did you send them an email with links to training videos on YouTube? If your training materials are in multiple places, your partners will lose them. That’s why it’s important to consolidate all of your materials in one place such as a PRM. A PRM is designed to store all of your material and resources in one place. Your partners will be able to easily find the document they need or the video they want to send a prospect instead of having to sort through their email to find an attachment or a link. 

Provide Resources

It’s also important to give your partners resources that benefit them. Like you, your partners are constantly looking to improve how they do business. Give them resources on how to market on Instagram, on how to claim their business on Google. By giving them these resources, you’re showing that you’re showing them that you care about their business which leads to better relationships with your partners.

Clear Messaging

Also don’t forget to be clear and consistent with your messaging. Your partners need to know exactly what they can expect from your partner program. They need to know what happens to their leads once they hand them over to you. If you don’t give your partner this information, they won’t trust you. If your partners don’t trust that you have their best interests in mind, they’ll go to your competitor. 

Your messaging about your product also needs to be consistent. You can’t give one partner completely different product messaging from another. There will be some variation in your messaging due to region, language, ect…but the key points of the message should remain consistent among your partners. 

Remove Obstacles

Finally, one of the best ways to keep it simple is to remove any obstacles that could prevent your partner from selling your product. Give them sales decks, product demos, ect. This makes it incredibly easy for your partner to start selling your product right from the start. 

Key Points

  • Give your partners one central place where they can access all of your resources
  • Give your partners resources that benefit their business
  • Communicate with your partners 
  • Remove obstacles allowing your partners to immediately start selling

Example: Nextiva’s CoNEXtion

Nextiva an award-winning cloud-based communication company with more than 100,000 customers relies heavily on partnerships to do business. To keep it simple for their partners, they launched Nextiva CoNEXtion Partner Demand Suite for their self-service partners. This suite contained everything their partners needed to sell Nextiva’s products such as a marketing automation tool, marketing strategy tips, and more. 

The suite made it easy for Nextiva’s partners to find what they needed. They were immediately able to start generating demand and deals. Partners were able to understand how they fit into Nextiva’s marketing strategy and how they would benefit. 

In addition, Nextiva’s channel marketing team wasn’t overwhelmed with requests for help as they had been previously. They could focus their efforts on continuously engaging their partners and helping them follow up after their initial campaigns had been sent. 

For more on how Nextiva kept it simple for their partners, check out our case study.

Conclusion

Keeping things simple for your partners lets them start selling immediately. It also improves your relationship with your partners and makes their lives much easier. You can keep things simple by communicating your terms clearly to your partners. You should also keep your product messaging consistent. Finally, giving your partners plenty of resources and keeping those resources in one place is essential. 

xAmplify’s through-channel marketing automation helps keep things simple by combining all the features of a PRM with an out-of-the-box marketing automation platform. Our platform makes it easy for your partners to share your content with their prospects in just a few clicks.

Schedule a demo to learn more.

Partnernomics Podcast: Strategic Partnerships in the FinTech Sector

In the latest Partnernomics episode, Soumya Chakrabarty head of Strategic Partnerships at Discover Global Network talks about the growing FinTech sector and how Discover seeks partnerships. FinTech is a growing space for partnerships and anyone interested in finding partners in the space should listen. 

Here’s what we learned. 

  • Partnerships should create unique value for the end-customer
  • Being flexible with your partnerships allows for the partnership to provide unique value
  • FinTech partnerships enable digital products and services to quickly go to market

Chakrabarty also shared that if you’re looking to partner with Discover, you should emphasize how partnering with you will bring unique value to the end-customer. Think about what differentiates you and how that makes the end-customer experience better. Even if you’re not in the FinTech sector, this is still good advice for proposing a partnership to a well-known company. 

Listen to the podcast here

How to make sure your direct sales don’t collide with partner’s deals

Channel conflict happens. It leads to commissions being lost, partners working with competitors and other consequences that ultimately lead to you losing revenue. One form of this conflict is between your direct sales team and your partners. 

You’re creating conflict. Your direct sales team is interfering with a partner’s account or opportunity by directly selling to them. This undercuts your partner, makes them look bad and results in them losing revenue. It also damages your relationship with your partner and your relationship with the channel. People talk and no one wants to work with a vendor that undercuts their partners. 

Unfortunately, we can’t prevent this. No matter what you do, someone isn’t going to get the memo and your direct sales team and your partners will step on each other’s toes. But, there are ways to reduce the possibility of it happening. 

Ways to reduce conflict

  1. Keep them separate 

Your direct sales team is less likely to come into conflict with your partners if they sell in different spaces. This can be done by geography or by product line. Doing it by geography lets your direct sales team and your partner sell in different regions. While they still may sell the same thing, they’re doing so in different places. Separating them by product line lets both your sales team and your partner sell in the same place, but they’re selling different products. Both of these methods reduce the likelihood of your partners and your team going after the same prospect. 

  1. Turn them into a team

Instead of letting your sales team and your partners compete for prospects, make them work with each other. This is easier if you’re working with partners who complement your product. Let your direct sales team and your partners strategize with each other. They’ll see who’s involved with which prospect and come up with the best ways to present your product. 

Allow them to swap ideas and train each other. Your sales team will have a better understanding of your product than your partner, but your partner may understand the market better. Let them learn from each other. It’ll build relationships between them and your partners will feel more comfortable going to your sales team for support. 

  1. Find complementary partners 

Instead of targeting partners who compete with your sales team, find partners who add additional value to your product. This allows your sales team to sell directly to prospects who want your product as a standalone offering. Your partners offer your product along with additional services or products to those prospects who want your product as part of a package. 

Your sales team and your partners can then work together to sell to both groups. 

  1. Register leads

Here’s a scenario. 

Your partner speaks to Jane. Jane then comes and checks out your website. She downloads a whitepaper and her information gets sent to your direct sales team. Your direct sales team calls her and your partner finds out. 

Your partner gets upset because they’ve spoken to Jane first. Your direct sales team thinks Jane should be their lead because she went to your website and downloaded a whitepaper. 

Who gets the lead in this case? 

Both your partner and your direct sales team have spoken to Jane. You don’t know what stage of the process Jane is in. She might be ready to sign a deal with your partner for all you know. You don’t want both your partner and your direct sales team talking to Jane. That’ll just confuse her and if that confusion turns into frustration, she’ll probably decide to go with your competitor instead. 

Registering leads can lessen the chances of this scenario happening. When you register leads, you claim them for a set period of time. During this time period, no one else is supposed to sell to the lead. 

This claim period ensures that the prospect is only talking to one person and lessens the chances of them being told different things and getting confused. It also lessens the chances of hurt feelings as both your direct sales team and your partner knows whose lead it is. 

While you’re finding ways to reduce conflict between your partners and your direct sales team, don’t forget to make it clear where the boundaries are. Let your sales team and your partner know how opportunities are owned. Make sure it’s clear on how your partners and your sales team are compensated. Offer additional incentives to your sales team for working with your partners.  

Conflicts between your direct sales team and your partners are unavoidable. You can reduce the chances of those conflicts happening by making sure your partners and your sales team are selling in different regions, by making them work together and by finding partners who add more value to your product. Having your sales team work with your partners may even expand the number of opportunities that come your way increasing you and your partners revenue.

Deal Registration, the Good and the Bad

Deal registration is a big deal. It’s one of the most important KPIs for the health of your channel. The channel runs on partnerships. These partnerships occur when companies repackage/resell products from another company (the vendor). Partners make money on these transactions through commissions, discounts, etc…In order to ensure they actually make money, partners will fill out their vendor’s deal registration form. 

Having your partners fill out a deal registration form gives you data on a potential customer and lets you know what your partner is offering that customer. With this, you can measure partner performance and reduce channel conflict. Without it, you’re flying blind.

Why is deal registration so important?

Deal registration is a way for partners to share leads and deals they have been developing for you. It also lets them claim a lead for a set period of time and prevent other people including their vendor from stealing the lead. Once that period of time has expired the lead opens back up. 

This is a way to reduce channel conflict as others can’t bypass the partner and sell to that lead for that period of time. Vendors may also offer their partners help in closing that deal. 

Deal registration also offers insights into the partner’s performance. Vendors know how satisfied their partners are and who are their most active partners. Partners know how well they work with a particular vendor and can identify potential areas in which they can improve. This allows both the vendor and the partner to evaluate their relationship and see if it is worth continuing.

How does it work?

Deal registration programs, which are run by the vendor, often offer additional incentives for partners to register the deals they make. This increases the profits of the partner. Each vendor will have their own rules on who can take part in the deal registration program and what incentives they offer.

Elements of a good deal registration program 

A good deal registration program has 3 key elements

  1. Forms

Your deal registration system should be easy to use. Keep your partner’s time in mind. Make sure your deal registration forms are simple, easy to use, and don’t ask for any unrelated information.

These forms should contain the name of the deal, the type of deal, the potential amount of the deal and the estimated close date of the deal. If you are giving your partner the forms through a PRM, they should not need to ask about your partner’s contact details as those should already be in your system. 

 Here’s an example of a simple deal registration form below. 

Caption: xAmplify deal registration form

  1. Rewarding Incentives

Make sure you’re making the process rewarding. Most vendors offer their partners monetary incentives. Monetary incentives can be product discounts, commissions, rebates, ect. 

 If your incentives aren’t the right ones, then your partner has no reason to register a deal with you. They may even take that deal to your competitor if they offer better incentives. 

To make sure your incentives are right, make sure they reflect the degree of effort involved. If a deal is more complex, then you’ll want to offer more of an incentive. These incentives can also motivate less active partners to become more active. You’ll want to think about this and select the most appropriate incentive that works for your partners and you. 

  1. Clear Rules

Your deal registration program rules need to be clear. This prevents abuse. Communicate these rules to your partner and enforce them.

These rules typically consist of the eligibility criteria of a deal, any exceptions to the process, and the potential reasons for rejecting a deal. Each vendor will have their own rules and partners should check them before registering a deal. 

When developing your rules take common scenarios into account. Consider what the rules are for a potential customer wanting to go with a different partner and other such scenarios. This ensures that you have policies on what to do if channel conflict arises. 

Deal Registration Problems

Unfortunately, deal registration isn’t perfect. For most partners, it’s a necessary but tedious step they have to take. Most deal registration programs make that step more complicated for partners by being inconsistent in enforcement, manual forms and having a complicated approval process. This makes protecting the deal more of a burden than losing it. 

Manual forms

Deal registration forms are mostly manual. This makes it tedious for partners as they have to fill out the entire deal registration form each time and with all the information that the vendor requests. Vendors tend to request the partner’s company information, the prospect’s company information, relationship to the prospect and much more. This allows them to evaluate whether the partner is the right one to pursue the deal. 

With automation and integration, the partner only needs to fill out the necessary information such as their relationship to the prospect and what deal the partner plans to offer the prospect. The system will populate other necessary information such as the partner’s company information which should already be in the vendor’s records. Automation also more easily integrates the deal registration form with your CRM so you can review and track the deal registration.

Without it, you would have to either manually copy the information over to your CRM or it would be created as a lead instead of a deal. If it is created as a lead instead of a deal in your CRM, you would have to add in the necessary information in order to change it to a deal. Either way, it’s more work for you. 

Inconsistent Enforcement

Vendors don’t always protect the deals that their partners register with them. Sometimes, the vendor’s direct sales team poached the deal or let another partner work the lead during the claim period. This destroys all trust between the vendor and the partner. The partner will no longer want to work with the vendor and will warn other partners away.

A Complicated Approval Process

Your partners don’t work for you. Partners are individual businesses and have other things to do. They don’t have the time to jump through the hoops your deal registration’s approval process. If your approval process involves the partner documenting every presale effort they made to that deal, then it’s too complicated. Make sure your approval process doesn’t involve much work for your partners. 

Conclusion

Deal registration enables visibility into partners performance. It allows the partner to claim a lead for a set period of time reducing channel conflict. This process isn’t perfect. Deal registration programs can fail if they are too complex or if they aren’t automated. This creates more work for the partner making them less likely to use the program.

To learn more about easier deal registration, contact us.

PartnerUp Podcast: Marketo’s Partner Program Structure and Tiers

In the latest episode of the PartnerUP podcast, Stephen Ceplenski talks about designing and managing Marketo’s Partner Program. Celpenski has been managing Marketo’s program up until a few years ago when Marketo got acquired by Adobe. He shares his insights on how to best structure a partner program.

Here’s what we learned. 

  • Your partner program doesn’t work if you can’t attract the right partners.
  • If you thoroughly analyze what you need from a partner program, you stand a better chance of choosing the right partners
  • If you get buy-in from all of the departments in your company, creating a partner program goes a lot more smoothly. For example, once Marketo’s software engineering department understood that they’d get a private beta environment with partners willing to test products in advance. This testing would ensure that the engineers were aware of product issues a lot quicker and partners would be willing to be thorough in their testing as any product issues would affect their reputation as well. Once the software engineers understood this, they were much more receptive to the idea of a partner program. 

You’ll want to listen to this podcast if you’re thinking about creating a partner program, are in the process of creating one or are looking to redesign yours. Listen to it here.

Podcast: How to Drive Cloud Adoption in the Channel

In the latest Channel Journeys podcast, Lana King talks about why your partners may be dragging their feet on cloud adoption. Lana is the VP of Partner Programs, Training and Enablement at Mitel shares what she learned from overseeing thir partner program. 

Here’s what we learned:

  • Partners are afraid that they’ll have to hand their customers over once all of the paperwork is signed. 
  • Partners feel more comfortable when they own the entire customer relationship. 
  • Partners may already be supporting their customers through the entire customer lifecycle. 
  • Taking a backseat and supporting your partners makes for a better partner relationship. 

Knowing why some of your partners are adopting the cloud helps you tailor your program, shows you’re listening, and makes for a better relationship. 
Listen to the podcast here.